Typishly welcomes submissions from established and emerging writers of short fiction and poetry. (Each submission is subject to a USD$3.00 reading fee.)

What are our deadlines?

  • We are always open for General Submissions of poetry and short fiction.
  • Our Weekend Roundtable: Poetry/Short Story Call for Submissions has a weekly Saturday deadline and is the best way to get your work to the top of the pile for first consideration.
  • Our revolving Creative Challenges also have deadlines, usually about three weeks each.

Who will read your work?

The Founder & Editor of Typishly is a Creative Director and writer who has received international awards for creativity. His ideas have helped many well-known global companies with famous brands. He has been evaluating creative work and mentoring writers for a couple of decades.

We do not accept submissions by email. If you send work to us by email it will not be read. Your submission might not be published on our website. Before making a submission to Typishly please read our Terms of Use.

1. Read a couple of poems at Typishly.com to see what we like.

2. We permit submissions of 5 poems at once. It's okay to be unconventional, surprising, different. Short or long. 

3. Tell us a bit about yourself. Let us know if you've been published and where. Why did you write these poems?

A few words of caution:

Half of our readers view Typishly on an iPhone, with its relatively small and narrow screen, not on a laptop. Many poets, however, send us luxuriously long lines, sometimes with words spaced apart and scattered across a wide page full of beautiful white space. Unfortunately, this artful approach does not display well on an iPhone, where unexpected, uncontrollable line breaks are a regular occurrence. If you'd like to control the way your poem is read, we advise you to use relatively short lines, left-justify all lines, and avoid the use of tabs or extra spaces between words on a line. If you simply must use long lines, just know that they are going to break when they arrive at the right side of a mobile phone screen. We can't prevent that.

What to do:

1. Read a couple of short stories at Typishly.com to see what we like.

2. One story per submission. You're welcome to make more than one submission if you want us to read more than one of your stories.

3. Don’t submit short fiction over 5,000 words long. Our sweet spot is even shorter than that at 2,500 to 3,000 words. 1,000 word flash fiction is fine. If you have something beautiful or intense or vivid or surprising that runs 100 words, go for it.

4. Tell us a bit about yourself. Let us know if you've been published and where. Why did you write this story?

    Every weekend, we sit around a big old harvest table and read submissions. The ones we receive here in Typishly's Weekend Roundtable Call for Submissions are moved to the top of the pile for first consideration. (That’s NOT a guarantee we’ll publish your stuff, but we’ll give it our full attention.)

    What to do: 

    1. Read a couple of short stories or poems at Typishly to see what we publish.
    2. Submit ONE story - OR - up to FIVE poems in a submission. If you have more, make more than one submission. Don’t submit short fiction over 5,000 words long. Flash fiction is fine.
    3. Tell us a bit about yourself. Let us know if you've been published and where. Why do you write?

      This is NOT a contest. There are no prizes. It’s a creative challenge. We’ll publish every submission that tickles our fancy. And we’ll do that as the submissions roll in. We’re not waiting until after the deadline to publish. When our deadline has come and gone, we’ll repeat the challenge with different words/phrases.

      WHAT TO DO: We’ve provided three options below, each containing three words or phrases. Choose only ONE option. You MUST USE ALL THREE of the exact words or phrases found within the option you choose. Use the three words or phrases in any order, somewhere within your short story or poem. It helps if you BOLD them, so readers can easily find them.

      (What you do with the rest of your piece is totally up to you. Be inventive. Be unexpected. Surprise us with your creativity.)

      EITHER 

      USE ALL 3 OF THESE WORDS/PHRASES IN YOUR SHORT STORY OR POEM (IN ANY ORDER)…

      seagulls drifted     /     Marilyn stretched      /     flat tire

      OR 

      USE ALL 3 OF THESE WORDS/PHRASES IN YOUR SHORT STORY OR POEM (IN ANY ORDER)...

      lollipop      /        dance lessons      /      just got fired

      OR 

      USE ALL 3 OF THESE WORDS/PHRASES IN YOUR SHORT STORY OR POEM (IN ANY ORDER)...

      collision    /      undecided     /       micro

      This is NOT a contest. There are no prizes. It’s a creative challenge. We’ll publish every submission that tickles our fancy. And we’ll do that as the submissions roll in. We’re not waiting until after the deadline to publish. When our deadline has come and gone, we’ll repeat the challenge with different sentences.

      WHAT TO DO: You MUST USE ONLY ONE of the three sentences below to END your short story or poem. (What you do with the rest of your piece is totally up to you. Be inventive. Be unexpected. Surprise us with your creativity.)

      CHOOSE ONLY ONE OPTION BELOW:

      EITHER 

      USE THIS SENTENCE TO END YOUR STORY OR POEM:

      Maybe she would, maybe she wouldn't.

      OR 

      USE THIS SENTENCE TO END YOUR STORY OR POEM:

      He loved her, it was that simple.

      OR

      USE THIS SENTENCE TO END YOUR STORY OR POEM:

      A grinding noise, metal on metal, intermittent.

      This is NOT a contest. There are no prizes. It’s a creative challenge. We’ll publish every submission that tickles our fancy. And we’ll do that as the submissions roll in. We’re not waiting until after the deadline to publish. When our deadline has come and gone, we’ll repeat the challenge with different sentences.

      WHAT TO DO: You MUST USE ONLY ONE of the three phrases below to BEGIN your short story or poem. (What you do with the rest of your piece is totally up to you. Be inventive. Be unexpected. Surprise us with your creativity.)

      CHOOSE ONLY ONE OPTION BELOW:

      EITHER 

      USE THIS PHRASE TO BEGIN YOUR STORY OR POEM:

      On that babbling Monday morning

      OR 

      USE THIS PHRASE TO BEGIN YOUR STORY OR POEM:

      She was on the platform, waiting.

      OR

      USE THIS PHRASE TO BEGIN YOUR STORY OR POEM:

      It was a minute sloppy with potential.